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Climbing Uluru to be banned by October 2019

Walking on Uluru will be banned in October 2019
Walking on Uluru will be banned in October 2019

Climbing Uluru will be banned by October 2019, in a unanimous decision by the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park board.

“Some people in tourism and government for example might have been saying we need to keep it open but it’s not their law that lies in this land,” said Sammy Wilson, chairman of the board.

“It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland.”

It’s one of those bucket-list destinations in Australia, and a popular one amongst us 4WDers. You’ve got 4WD tracks taking off in all directions from Yulara, making it an unforgetting start or finish point. Back a  few years ago, we did the Gunbarrel Highway from Wiluna, and finished off at the rock.

Those who have climbed Uluru, otherwise known as Ayer’s Rock, will know that there is plenty of signage asking people to not climb the rock, out of respect for its spiritual significance. Now, those wishes of the traditional owners will be kept.

The start date of the ban is October 26th 2019, which coincides with the 34th anniversary of Uluru returning back into the hands of the traditional owners.

 

5 Comments

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  • I first camped at the Rock in the late 1960s.
    It was a s&#@ corrugated track out there then. Even the locals didn’t go there. We camped against the rock, never climbed and never left our rubbish. Many times we were the only people there.
    Over the years I have been there many times. 2 years ago was my “last visit” ever.
    It’s become a tourist trap. I Can tell you many story’s . But in this new world we live in I’ll keep them to myself.
    Stopping the climbing of the rock is not nessesary, there again I hold my experience to myself
    It’s my belief that travelling in WA/NT is slowly being stiflied by shall we say Policatical correctness and the rising power of the activists in the Aboriginal community in driving their case forward.

  • I first camped at the Rock in1969.
    It was a s&#@ corrugated track out there then. Even the locals didn’t go there. We camped against the rock, never climbed and never left our rubbish. Many times we were the only people there.
    Over the years I have been there many times. 2 years ago was my “last visit” ever.
    It’s become a tourist trap. I Can tell you many story’s . But in this new world we live in I’ll keep them to myself.
    Stopping the climbing of the rock is not nessesary, there again I hold my experience
    It’s my belief that travelling in WA/NT is slowly being stiflied by shall we say Policatical correctness and the rising power of the activists in the Aboriginal community in driving their case forward.
    This will serve no one especially the people who live in remote areas.

  • John i have traveled a lot around Australia and seen and heard about your comment about Aussie . First the land was stolen from the first owners and since the thieves (white man) they have ruined the country and cannot look after it so they are now either giving it away or selling it to over seas company’s who are raping the land the aboriginal people have lived in harmony with this country for 60.000 years who are we to try and change there customs and faiths do you see these people climbing all over the many church’s of many faiths that the white man has,
    The activists that you talk about were taught by the white man why cant we respect the culture and faiths of theses people who still own the land

  • Mick, I challenge you to do some more research about who took this land from who before we “thieves” (as you put it) even got here and see if you still feel the same way. You may even find out if your “60k years” comment has any substance.

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