News Video

The 4X4 Beer Economy: What is a recovery worth?

Mitsubishi Pajero bogged at Gunn Point, in the Northern Territory
Mitsubishi Pajero bogged at Gunn Point, in the Northern Territory

If you recover someone out in the bush? Do you expect some kind of remuneration in return? I’m not talking about exchanging money, but rather a bartering system of goods in exchange for the recovery.

This comes after a local Territorian was left feeling cheated after he recovered a vehicle for some tourists, but was left empty-handed at the end of it all.

What’s a fair amount to expect? Is it okay to ask for something up front? Should it be beer or another cold drink to trade? Some play by rules, where others don’t. Let’s look at the brass tacks.

Land Rover Discovery bogged on the beach
Land Rover Discovery bogged on the beach

A snatch strap will cost you anywhere between $40 and $80, depending on what brand you buy. Safe practice indicates you should only use our strap between a half-dozen and a dozen times in an actual recovery situation, before your turf it out for a new one. This really depends on how hard you use the straps, how well-made it is and how well you take care of your gear. But the point here is: Straps have a finite life, and each time you use it effectively costs you money.

You’re using your vehicle, recovery points and gear, and maybe even some recovery board and a winch as well. Your time is one thing you need to consider as well, right? You might get wet and muddy in the process of the recovery, and you’re risking damage to your own vehicle in the whole process.

What if you’re putting in the hard yakka, pushing through mud or digging with a shovel under the sun? Does the amount of effort expended relate to the final reward?

What’s a reasonable ‘fee’ to ask or expect in this situation? Tell us what you think in the comments below. You never know, maybe we can set up some rules …

 

60 Comments

Click here to post a comment

  • Its simple I will pull you out with your gear and I would appreciate if you pulled me out with MY gear, that’s the only payment I ask. But if we have time I am sure we will have a beer and a laugh.

  • I’ve lived in the bush. I’m often surprised by ‘Townies’ fitting two-way radios but carrying nothing in the way of recovery gear when preparing to go off-road.
    In one Summer I heard (over the UHF) cries for help from four of those odd souls and went to offer my help. One bloke said “Nup! I’ll manage.” That, I thought, was strange – he had called. Anyway the other three were women drivers with kids still sitting in the very hot cars and they did accept assistance. Each of them told their children to thank me for the nice cold drinks I gave them and then offered to pay, and just one asked how I knew she was there.
    I said “No” to the payment offers and explained to the young lady that her radio call alerted me, adding that, in future, she should have her car ‘checked’ before going bush (the car motor had over-heated) – all I did was fill the radiator. She was lucky!
    So, the moral of this tale, give willing, be prepared, and accept graciously. Our world will be a better place!!

  • I got bogged once after a downhill run ending in bull dust around Coffin Bay in with a very capable Musso. 2 superdeluxe landcruisers pulled us out . When it got pulled up to not-ankle-deep-dust, one of the guys asked how far i had let the tire pressure drop….ehh ‘how far’? Just arrived from Holland i had no clue about 4wding so i had just dropped it a bit like 2psi. We all had a laugh, me being an ass, them meeting one. Payment comes usually as a nice story for later. Not in cash. Except of course for damaged goods

  • Don’t have to have a 4WD to rescue people. I got to tow a fool off the beach at Palm Beach in Sydney of all places. He came screaming along out onto the sand and tried to do a sand churning turn back to the tarmac. Needless to say his soft roader (Tiguan) went down to the sills and stopped dead. He eventually sent his girlfriend over to sheepishly ask if I could help. I tried digging him out and used some fibreglass boards to help him out, but alas to no avail. Eventually , with boards in place and 4 lengths of hauling ropes I got him out with my Diesel Yota Hiace work van. The real clincher was he had no idea that his vehicle had tow hooks and checkouts in the bumpers they screwed into… Didn’t get didley for my help , and I spent almost an hour of my time, shoulda just let him call a tow truck and pay their exorbitant rates, along with the wait at 12AM in the morning.

  • I’m very happy to read that most people would and do help without expecting payment.
    I’m sad that this has even been brought up! It’s simple, help those in need. You never know when the shoe is on the other foot and you will need help to recover your vehicle.

  • HERE WE GO — EVEN THE THOUGHT OF EXPECTING PAYMENT TURNS MY GUT AND I THINK THOSE THAT DO ARE A NEW BREED A BREED EDUCATED TO THINK I I I I AND ME ME ME LOOK AT ME AND ALL THE TOP GEAR IVE GOT WHY SHOULD I RESCUE YOU AND YOUR SHIT BOX WITHOUT PAYMENT — ITS A SHAME I CANT PICK THESE PEOPLE BY SIGHT AS THEY ARE THE ONES I WOULD DRIVE PAST WHEN THEY ARE STUCK — THE OLD ADAGE DO UN TO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD HAVE DONE TO YOU SPRINGS TO MIND –MY GOD I KNOW WHAT IT IS TO BE POOR THE MORNING AFTER WE GOT MARRIED WE HAD TWO POUNDS THATS TWO DOLLARS TO OUR NAME AND NO ONE TO HELP SHE JUST OVER FIFTEEN AND ME EIGHTEEN –IT TOOK US A LONG TIME TO GET AN OLD SHORTY LANDY OF DUBIOUS MECHANICAL SOUNDNESS AND MAKE NO MISTAKE WE WERE CLUELESS TOTALLY UNAWARE OF THE PITFALLS OF 4X4ING BUT THE SHEER JOY OF EXPLORING OFF THE BEATEN TRACK AND A LOT OF THE TIME NO TRACK TO US WAS PRICELESS AND MAKE NO MISTAKE WE HAD OUR SHARE OF BREAK DOWNS LUCKLY NO MAJOR DISASTERS USUALLY SPARK PROBLEMS AND IN GETTING STUCK IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS USUALLY FARMERS WHO CAME TO OUR AID AND LAUGHING MERRILY THEIR FIRST QUESTION USUALLY WAS WHAT ARE YOU BUGGARS DOING WAY OUT HERE OR WHERE THE HELL DID YOU COME FROM — NEVER ONCE DID ONE EVEN HESITATE TO HELP NEVER ONCE DID ONE ASK FOR PAYMENT AND THE FEW TIMES WE DID HAVE A FEW DOLLARS AND OFFER TO PAY I COULD ALMOST SEE HURT IN THEIR EYES AND EMBARRASSMENT ON THEIR FACES—MOST OF THE TIME WE ENDED UP AT THEIR HOMES AND ALONG WITH BEING FED THEY WOULD TELL HOW THEY WOULD LOVE TO DO WHAT WE WERE DOING — JESUS WHAT HAPPENED TO THE GOOD OLD DAYS –I NOW HAVE A REASONABLE VEHICLE AND WOULD NEVER JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER I WILL ALWAYS HELP ALL WITHOUT THOUGHT OF REWARD AND EVEN IF THEY DONT THANK ME I LEAVE THEM WITH THE THOUGHT OF HOW HAPPY I WOULD BE IF IN THEIR SHOES —NOT ALL ARE EXPERTS NOT ALL ARE KNOW IT ALLS THE NEW TO 4X4ING YOUNG OR OLD GET THEIR EXPERIENCE AS THEY GO AND USUALLY BOUGHT AT THAT AND THE BOUGHT ONES ARE THE STUFF YOU REMEMBER MOST –LASTLY YOU CANT HELP FOOLS AND SNOBS THE LATTER BEING THE WORST –LASTLY I STILL THINK THAT OLD SHORTIE LANDY WAS AS CAPABLE A 4X4 AS I HAVE OWNED AND I HAVE OWNED A FEW AND THATS SAND AND BUSH 4X4ING AND WE WONT GO INTO COMFORT SAGA —RUTHIE CAN I COME WITH YOU BUGGAR MOST OF THIS NEW LOT —
    THIS IS AN EXTRA I HOPE YOU CAN PRINT –WHEN KIDS WE LIVED REMOTELY AND RELIGIOUS TEACHINGS WERE ALMOST NON EXISTENT HOW EVER ABOUT EVERY THREE MONTHS OR SO A CATHOLIC PRIEST WOULD COME TO ONE OR ANTHER PERSONS HOMES AND SERVE MASS AND MUCH AGAINST OUR GRAIN US KIDS –EIGHT –OF US –WERE FORCED TO GO NEITHER OF OUR PARENTS WERE CATHOLIC — NOW THIS PARTICULAR SUNDAY WAS EASTER AND WAS TO BE HELD IN THE HOME OF THE FAMILY WITH THE LARGEST LOUNGE ROOM — WHEN WE ARRIVED THERE WAS A GREAT TURNOUT OF THE LOCAL FOLK MAY BE FORTY OR SO AND NO PRIEST IT WAS A NINE O-CLOCK START ( NO PHONES HERE ) AND BY ABOUT 9-45 AM THERE WAS TALK OF GOING LOOKING AND WHERE COULD HE BE– WITH OUT GOING ON HE EVENTUALLY TURNED UP LOOKING VERY FLUSTERED AND DISHEVELED –THE FAMILY QUICKLY USHERED HIM OFF TO GET CLEANED UP –NOW WITH ALL ASSEMBLED IN THE LOUNGE HE FRONTS UP TO THE DINING ROOM TABLE USED AS THE PULPIT AND BEGINS TO EXPLAIN HIS LATENESS –HE TELLS OF HOW HE GOT BOGGED AND JUST WHEN HE HAD GIVEN UP ALONG CANE FARMING BROTHERS ROB AND KEN BALL — THE GOOD PRIEST REALLY GOT INTO THE TALE TELLING OF HOW HE HAD SPENT AGES GATHERING STICKS AND BRANCHES TO PUT UNDER THE WHEELS HOW HE WORE HIMSELF TO A FRAZEL TRYING TO LEVERING IT WITH A POLE AND KEPT AT IT UNTIL HE WAS ABSOLUTELY EXHAUSTED AND HE THUMPED THE TABLE AND QUITE LOUDLY BLURTED DO YOU KNOW UN SEALED I WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE YET IF HE HADNT BEEN PULLED OUT BY THE BALLS –WELL IN MY LIFE TIME I AM SURE I HAVE NOT HEARD LOUDER –HARTIER OR PROLONGED LAUGHTER BY SO FEW –I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS TRUE STORY AND THANKS FOR THE CHANCE TO TELL IT

  • I believe we should offer to help another even if he/she has been a fool.
    As for payment, an offer should at least be made as this indicates their appreciation.
    Something like having a beer or cuppa with the people you assisted at the time is a good chance to get to know them and them to express their appreciation.
    Could be me next time.

  • I think it is as the majority of you have said, will help if can, no payment needed but a beer or whatever and a thanks would be appreciated. As some have said – it may be you needing a hand one day. I have helped numerous people in my travels but have only had to use my winch once for myself. That said, I admit I don’t do much sand driving. 1970 I put a rock through the sump in the Flinders which created a small oil leak. Station manager came along and gave me 20 lts of oil but would take nothing in return. Said it was a pity I couldn’t shoot a couple of donkeys who kept filling in a water hole so the sheep couldn’t get a drink. He had been trying to get them for a few years with no success. Offered me $50 (lot of money in 1970) if I could get them. Had to drive near the spot on the way out so deviated and bugger me, 2 donkeys, 2 shots. Left a note on the donkeys for him to find the next day saying thanks for the oil mate. Another day a fellow in a ford 150 bogged at the edge of a dam asked for help. He was well bogged and I said yes but if I snap an axle, winch rope or whatever you replace it. He told me where to go so I did. 3 days later he came back and asked if I would help and stated he would pay for any damage caused. Got him out and all was good. Didn’t offer me anything but I parted company just saying, “if you had of agreed to that 3 days ago you would have been a long way away from here by now”. Courtesy costs nothing, manners cost nothing and I can tell you, it is just as easy but much quicker to do the right thing by someone than the wrong thing.

  • Recently did a recovery that cost me $1200 to a lad stuck on a saltpan going fishing.
    Almost lost our car in the process 2014 Cruiza , was not a pretty site, stressing out myself and missues.
    His car was 2 wheel drive. We did get a thank you, but in future will be evaluating the situation more thoroughly.

  • Its Camilla Beach near Rocky and, despite my clear instructions as to coming in slowly and staying out of the sandy area of the camp site, old mate comes barrelling in and straight into the deep sand with his 5 tonne motor-home and Vitara on a trailer. The unit is fairly level so “leave it until the morning”. I offer instructions as he digs around his wheels (with my shovel) then, after he has got rid of the car trailer, he slowly edges forwards (onto my recovery mats). More of the same and eventually he’s on the firm ground where he should have gone. My reward- laughing inwardly at his wife promising him “a good slapping”.

  • I got horribly bogged in slippery mud a year or so back with a camper trailer on. I tried for a few hours without success. No trees to winch off etc etc. I walked to houses and a block with a cruiser was happy to help me but still could snatch me out. In the end we joined 5 straps and winch rope together to a tree 100m away and got out. He gave me a feed and helped me wash all my gear at his place. I bought him s carton of beer thinking it was the least I could do.

  • If you don’t want to help someone in need without any thoughts of compensation, then don’t even go there. If you damage or break your gear helping out & it’s not brand new out if the box that morning then don’t ask for replacement gear as you may well have damaged it previously. Straps are only good for about 1/2 dozen revoveries & need to be replaced as they suffer incredible shock loads. Your gear is your problem. If people aren’t prepared to simply help someone, they should go & find another hobby.

  • I will usaully help if they have there own snatch strap but that being said i have also had too use mine for some people who don’t have any recovery gear driving an AWD Territory.
    But most of the time a couple beers is always reward enough.

  • I spent hours recovering a vehicle off a beach, strap broke put a dent in back of my car,
    owner paid for my repair
    I was recently asked to get some backpackers out of the sand a Inskip point, I asked them for $500 up front in case any damage to my vehicle, all went well and no money needed
    I think from my experience, depending on who you are recovering, an up front show of cash is a good thing, most recoveries are because the driver did not take the time to check out where they were driving

  • Agree with the sentiment on why is this even an issue. Expect nothing welcome everything comes to mind. Pay it forward and it’ll come back atcha one day. Shame for even thinking we deserve payment for helping a fellow traveler regardless if they are are ill-prepared or out of their depth. A laugh, a smile, a job well done and thanks mates is all that is required. Tell me I’m wrong!

  • Hi, just want to say to Jamie above, I own a Subaru forester and they’re very capable cars. I did a trip to Fraser Island in July this year and made it to Sandy Cape with no problems at all and even snatched a Prado out of the ngkala rocks bypass while 2 4wd owners behind me didn’t even want to attempt to help because you could see from their body language they didn’t have a clue what to do but their young teenage son knew absolutely everything and offered all the advice in the world. The father than made up some crap that they didn’t know where their friends were to come and help. Needless to say I made a new friend after the rescue and the useless 4wd drivers left with their tales between their legs. So don’t judge a book by its cover, just because someone drives a 4wd doesn’t make them prepared and knowledgeable, and Subaru’s are the only “softroaders” that can do a majority of what “real 4wds” can do due to being true awd. Doesn’t matter what car you have, if you’re prepared and know how to drive properly you can do alot with your vehicle. Just don’t dismiss a driver because of what they drive one day someone like me may come along and be your only help.

    Just like another driver who bought a 4wd and took it to Newnes state forest who I came across who didn’t have any recovery gear because he apparently just got the car. He got caught up over a mound and needed help. He assumed because I drove a forester I didn’t have anything. So he said he’ll wait for someone else and was lucky 2 4wds just turned the corner and he ran off to them without even acknowledging my stop to help. He had his wife and kids in the car and risked doing tracks with them they he wasn’t prepared for on what was a fairly quiet day that day in Newnes. Very stupid on his part and very narrow minded because of the car I drove and because I had my wife 1.5yr old in the car.

    I make sure I’m self sufficient just so I don’t burden others who go out enjoying their time with their families and that’s how it should be.

  • I bought my first Series II Landrover in 1965 and I am still 4WDing but have gone upmarket these days with a 200 Series. Anyway in 51 years of 4wding in the bush and virtually rescuing someone almost every time we go out only once has anyone made some gesture. They were American Pilots stuck on Stockton Beach near Williamtown. We met up later in Newcastle and we had a great night drinking their beer at their expense. Other wise no one else has ever offered. They have been extremely grateful but I think because of the stress it doesn’t occur to them. I don’t expect payment and will continue to help people stranded. I don’t think I would accept money but will sing for beer.

  • Used to be on the water and assisted many boat owners with a thank you. And, you know what goes around, comes around. I needed assistance one day and help was there.

  • I don’t believe any form of payment is required however a simple “Thanks Mate, I appreciate all you have done” is mandatory. I know this sounds mean but I very rarely help anyone these days as there seem to be an attitude especially from the younger generation that they don’t have to thank you it is their right to have you rescue them.

    I will however help anyone that has made a genuine effort to give themselves every chance of getting themselves out. i.e, carrying their own gear, shovel, recovery tracks etc. It annoys me no end to have a driver of a RAV4 or Subaru Forester that has no right to be on the sand in the first place with no gear of their own flag you down and expect help.

    I go on the beach to fish and relax, not to ruin my day trying help idiots with no idea on what they are doing.

  • What an article Sam! It was a set of leading statements outlining the many ways we could be inconvenienced, incur costs and require compensation when helping someone. Not your finest hour. The same question could have been put to readers using a more balanced representation of possible attitudes and responses to a recovery situation.

    4wders share a spirit of adventure, mateship (helping one another!) and a down-to-earth attitude. All of which makes us want to get into the great outdoors.

    If we come across a keen 4wder who has become stuck, we help them, typically using their equipment.
    All that is expected is a sincere “thanks mate” at the end. Anything more is embarassing.

    If we come across someone new to offroading who is out of their depth and has become stuck, we help them too. That usually requires a combination of advice and equipment, often our own. Some people are clueless and it is amazing where and in what situation you find them. Despite this, we should be there to help, not to judge. We are also showing them the ‘rules off the road’, which means they learn it isn’t ok to just drive past someone in distress as now seems to be the norm when on the tarmac.

    It should be EXPECTED that anyone passing someone who is stuck will stop and help them. Simple as that.
    The helper should be thanked, but that’s all.

    I can’t believe you even wrote about payment being in consideration for the helper’s precious time! Wow. Is that the world we live in now? Payment should only occur if the helper’s recovery equipment takes a real beating. In that case, an experienced 4wder needing help should offer to pay and the helper should be ready to explain to a newcomer to 4wding that this stuff has a cost and that they ought contribute to that, as they may not understand this. Whichever way it goes, even if your equipment is used and even if it does cop a beating, there’s not an ENTITLEMENT to a financial contribution, that’s just what is preferable. If it doesn’t happen, keep smiling and get back to enjoying your trip.

    There are always exceptions to any rule. If you come across a pack of idiots who are stuck, but carrying on like mugs, then do the best you can, but weigh up your own safety – the option to not get involved is one available to you. Generally such types are only found in easy-access areas and often in large groups, so this situation is unusual.

    • Hi there, thanks for the comment. I wasn’t trying to pass my own opinion in the story, to be honest, but was interested in gauging what people think about the situation. Different people expect different things and run by different unwritten rules in this situation, it’s really interesting to read everyone’s opinions on the matter.

  • I was pulled out of a bog by a rescue group, asked them what sort of payment they wanted. Reply was we do it because we enjoy doing it. Tried to convince them to take something. but about half an hour later when vehicle was out, we agreed on me doing them a favour one day. So went on their group site and thanked them, still looking for a chance to repay favour.

  • I have no problem helping people with my gear after they have made a genuine attempt to get themselves out on their own. I am tired of interupting my own holiday to help people that have knowingly gone into places they shouldn’t in a car with bald tires. I drive a very equipped 4wd for the very reason that i like to get away on holiday to quiet remote places and then someone comes along in a car and just expects to be recovered, sorry this is my holiday dont come down into the sand when your not prepared. Those that are prepared and just had an unfortunate error in judgement then im happy to help and only expect a thank you and a cold beer.

  • I would frequent Fraser Is 12-18 times a year some years ago, however I never claimed to be an exspert. On one trip I came across one old gent Rainbow side of Eurong bogged to the chassis on the high tide mark, even though it was dead low tide. I pulled up and offered help, he’d borrowed the 4wd ute from his son without much “how to”. I asked is it in 4wd to his reply yes but it didn’t look right, did you engage the hubs mate…don’t need to it’s in 4wd was the reply, you need to engage the hubs, so I did. Mate your tyres aren’t down either, again don’t need to, where are you heading too, Orchid Beach then up to the Cape…mate let down your tyres. Set him up ready to go then off he went with his wife alongside. I told him not to drive on the high tide mark and drive along, the waters edge, don’t drive through it. His wife said thanks he gave a crap wave and gone. We pulled into Eurong grabbed a pie etc who did we meet up the beach….old mate bogged on the height tide mark, he flagged us down. I pulled up and said my piece he asked if I had a strap I said yes, I have all the gear winch Maxtraks etc, where’s yours, under all my gear and I can’t be bothered getting it, it’s either yours or your staying here. Five minutes later he was out and off he went again, again his wife said a thanks and that was it. We stopped to get some Cockles and bugger me there he was near Eli bogged again on the high tide mark.He seen me and walked out with his strap, I beeped and waved. Now the beach near the water was rock hard and I wasn’t even in four wheel drive, this guy had not idea and was more than happy not to listen.

  • We’re Aussies! We help people if they need our help, especially if they are in a remote and potentially dangerous location with no other help around. The law of the ocean is that you must help a stranded vessel in need. The same should apply in the bush. What sort of guilt would you feel if you left them and later read about it in the news? Plus you will have a story of adventure to tell for years to come.

  • If you EXPECT something in return for the favour, maybe you should mention it at the outset? Like yes I’ll help get you out but it’ll cost you a box, a slab or a carton what ever lingo you use.

    For me the offer to help if we are stuck is just something we all would like to hear. To offer something in return for help is always the right thing to do imo…you can always knock it back if you wish.

  • I think it natural for us to help other 4X4 enthusiasts as part of our culture and not want any reward for effort. A beer would be nice but not a requirement.
    Lets keep on helping each other out there on the tracks wherever they may be

  • It’s called KARMA. What goes around – comes around. A Thank you and an offer to replace broken/damaged gear is all that is required.

  • Why should you expect to be paid for helping someone out? It’s called human kindness and is what separates us from the animal kingdom. Certainly if something is damaged or broken then you could ask for some compensation. It’s probably OK to subtly mention this possibility up front, although not as a condition of helping. Hopefully your kindness will inspire others to do the same.

  • Come on guys. This is Australia ! If a bloke is stuck in the mud you go and give him a hand. A handshake and ‘thanks mate’ is all that is required. Give him some advise by all means but don’t analise him to see if your’e
    going to help him ! MJ.

  • I don’t think you should go into it expecting anything, and if I’m offered I don’t usually accept if it was just a a simple snatch or a loan of the maxtrax. It happens and you’d hope someone would help you out. As for wearing out gear, I don’t see it that way, I like having the opportunity to use my gear, and if it breaks or wears out that means I’ve got a reason to buy a new one.

    But if I was recovered I’d always offer a beer or offer to replace something that was damaged, but again my experience is that most people won’t accept more than a stubbie.

  • I think the person stuck should definitely be towed out using his gear first. The act of offering payment to me is probably more important than the $$$, although a cold beverage at the end is appreciated.

    That said if something breaks on you vehicle then perhaps that may be a difficult conversation. My Father and I pulled a 20 seater tourist mini bus out a ditch on the side on Cape tribulation rd not long after it was opened (he mustn’t have been paying attention or was going too fast on the dirt & slipped off the camber and got hung up… no major damage other than perhaps the alignment.

    Shorty story we used all our gear (while he looked on) and got him back on the road, but in doing so broke one of the front free wheeling hubs …. asked him to cover costs, old mates reply “Mate I didn’t ask for your help” … Bus company not interested either. Oh well live and learn. Luckily it was only just a drive back to cairns and a day less fishing.

  • i always help or at least offer it comes back what ya give but i always offer a beer to those who assist me and have been given a beer when shoe on other foot its not expected just a nice thing shows your appreciation and good to have a yarn as well thanks to the guys who snatched me out and van in cahills 3 weeks ago

  • Snatch straps are so cheap, that it really should be part of the stuck persons inventory. Maybe it should be part of the agreement that the stuckee should be prepared to buy the strap if needed and get to keep it for next time.

  • Offer to help just because you do . It’s the done thing , the right thing . You don’t do it for reward but compensation for damage would be OK .
    Offer something for being helped for sure .Compensate damaged gear definitely .
    Gotta remember we’re all able to help , or offer reward in different levels so probably shouldn’t judge too quickly if someone doesn’t fit your ethics . They just might not be able .
    Appreciation and a thank-you at least are free for most , even if we all express it differently .
    Most important is being genuine and there for each other .

  • I think its simple. You assess the situation and if you can help recover someone you are aware of the dangers to ones self before hand. Otherwise dont do it. But if you do its a free service as we would would expect the same in return. Thats real mateship.

  • In most cases payment offered would be rejected by the helper, satisfaction of another good deed for the day is usually enough. The thing that grinds my gears is the expectation of doing it for love with no slap onthe back or acknowledgement of the assistance rendered. A simple offer of payment is all that’s required with a sincere thank you. And everyone goes on there way happy.

  • My son got bogged in his Hummer, his mate went to get him out in his Ranger- got bogged, mum went & found a farmer, flat tyre on the tractor, boys fixed it, pulled both out . All this time we were measuring the bridge that was slowing disappearing under water but he still wouldn’t take any money, so the boys slipped a $50 each into farmers wife’s hand. We totally appreciated a job well done.

  • Oh another story we recovered a Rangie on a beach just out of Robe S A it took about an hour to dig and drag him out of the sand as the incoming tide was under his vehicle we expected no payment but this guy found where we were camped and bought us heaps of beer , wine and food he reckons his insurance excess was a lot more but we made a friend and had a party good outcome hey

  • I don’t really expect a payment but one time my snatch strap got frayed rendering it useless also I lent out a strap only never to see it again each time costing me a new strap so what do I do ’tis a dilemma, I would think payment should have been offered

  • Payment or rewards for helping out someone else. . How sad is your life and even this story???
    You do it because you should and its the right thing to do

  • Having helped a number of people in the past, and having not helped some, as Ken said, it all depends.

    For the person stuck on the beach in the middle of a very hot summer’s day with an incoming tide who refused to lower his tyres (still at road pressure) and wanted us to dig and push him out – advice was provided regarding tyre pressures and then I left him to the incoming tide. (Others came by before the tide and with lots of physical work dug him out.)

    For the fully-prepared 4WD on the other side of a very muddy and deep stream crossing who asked if I would recover him if he got stuck, I asked him to use his own snatch strap and attach it and pointed out he would be the one working in the mud. He tried to cross, got stuck and I happily recovered him (no payment expected).

    For the driver of a very poorly maintained vehicle stuck in a river crossing with no recovery gear on a ‘High Clearance 4WD’ only track, I checked he was safe and had provisions and offered to send out a recovery vehicle for him from the nearest town (which he would have to pay for). I did not offer to recover him given the strain this would place on my gear and car and the obvious unsuitability of his car for the track. He declined the offer of a proper recovery from town and decided to wait for someone else to help (which happened soon after).

    At the end of the day for me it comes down to how much risk the other driver has decided to take which they are now expecting my vehicle and equipment to recover them from when it goes wrong. I have paid for a lot of expensive equipment I would rather not have had to but this is part of being a responsible driver if I am attempting ‘risky’ tracks, whether they be remote or just simply tricky. In addition to the examples above, I have happily helped many others who have had misfortunes through bad luck or just something unexpected going wrong. While I will always make sure everyone is safe, I won’t always use my gear, vehicle or time to recover someone. When I do, I don’t expect anything other than thanks. In terms of damage to my gear or vehicle, I accept this is a risk I am taking when I agree to help them – one of the reasons there are situations I won’t help because of the real risk of damage to my equipment.

    In terms of others helping me, I have only ever needed to be recovered by a stranger once – who agreed to help get me out of a bog but only with a light pull and one attempt as he was concerned about damage to his gear and vehicle (it was early in my 4WDing days and I fitted most of the categories above – I was on Fraser in a borrowed F250, not suitable for the conditions with no recovery gear and got caught short by an unexpected rain shower which turned conditions muddy). Luckily for me the one attempt worked.

  • Do we really need to be paid?? We’ve helped people on the track over the years and nothing beats a good story around the camp fire (when we are allowed to have them). Just a ‘thanks mate’ should do. When did we become so obsessed with our ‘stuff’? If you’re smart enough to bring all the right gear then good for you but not everyone is that clever and it’s not our job to parent people. Just help out – it’s good for the soul.

  • The offer is important. You should use as much of their gear as possible but if you are using any of your own then there’s an obligation for the rescued party to compensate you for the broken gear. An offer of a case of beer or to recover your own gear replacement should be considered.

  • I recovered a couple – in a Commodore Wagon – stuck in the mallowy sand on the back-side of Lake Bonney. He’d gotten around the lake about 500m before he went down to the Axles. It was high summer and He & his wife had been there overnight. It was too far to walk anywhere for help, and far too hot during the day @ 44C. So When I happened upon them and pulled them out to clear track, the sheer relief gratitude and appreciation they expressed for that extraction was sufficient for me. I didn’t have my recovery gear on me at the time, but he had an old ski rope in the back. So I chugged past him & got our vehicles back to back. We had to use the Ski rope looped back & forward between the two vehicles – 6 x times – but it worked well.

  • I reckon it depends on situation; I was stuck once on an incoming tide, I got help from a fisherman just after tided was turning (the best time to fish) he spent over an hour and used his own gear although I had mine at the ready, he wanted to use his, he’d never used it before, in the end I offered paying something, he said not, I said well at least a carton of beer (I had a 50 note in my pocket), he wouldn’t take it, but I would have rather he did as he used his gear and missed the prime hour of fishing. Anyway, my point is anyone being helped should offer and be willing to pay at least for wear and tear on gear and be prepared to compensate for there time. PS. I would definitely take a carton as payment for a job well done.

  • It’s the “code of like endeavors”. I made that up but i like it so ill leave it in.

    I dont think you should ever expect a reward of anysort for recovering / rescuing someone especially in the outback were it can be life or death. You dont charge someone for helping them unless that’s your business and you’re working.

    Regarding kit; the rescuee is responsible for providing all the gear needed to be recovered. The rescuer only needs to provide something if the rescuee hasnt got it. If something of the rescuer’s is broken or ruined during the recovery it should be replaced by the rescuee. If the piece of kit was on its last legs before the recovery or the kit was used in detrimental way unecessarily, then the rescuer should think twice about accepting a replacement.

    The rescuee should arrange a post recovery celebration comensurate with the seriousness of the situation and the level of effort, skill and kit used. That could range from a beer or a cuppa and a “thanks mate” to a few beers and dinner no need for anything more. But again the rescuer shouldnt expect anything more than a handshake.

    If someone has to travel a significant way off their planned route to help the rescuee should offer to replace their fuel. No one can be expected to comphensate for time lost on the trip wear and tear etc and it shouldnt be considered.The rescuer just has to accept it as an experience, an infrequent consequence of traveling the outback.

    Think of it as cruising the oceans. If your ship is closest, even if its hours in the opposite direction, it’s your responsibility to attempt to rescue survivors.

  • We got recovered from the Flinders River by a farmer who wouldn’t take anything but that didn’t stop us sending a Thank you card and some scratchies when we got home. We weren’t looking forward to spending the night in the river on a track that didn’t have a lot of traffic going through and that was actually closed at the other end.

  • The thing is you would never leave someone stuck and hope you would never be left stuck yourself and would think genuine people would offer you something in return for your help especially if you damage your gear helping them I know that when I go bush I have all the gear I need to get out of trouble and most of the time I use it to get others out if you have the right setup and know how to use it you should not have trouble having said that not every thing goes to plane a thank you and at least an offer of a drink would be nice

  • dont expect payment unless you break gear then the person should pay for that but also hope this person helps the next person he seas stranded

  • A Few Beers / Bundies, Definitely, Maybe a Good Feed. Not Unreasonable to Expect Payment for Damaged / Broken Recovery Gear Either. As An Assisting Vehicle, You Should Not Have To ask!!
    We Helped Recover a Vehicle and Camper From Nolans Brook on The Tele Track, Old Mate Wasn’t Happy about Paying for 2 x Snatch Straps Damaged in the Process, What if we needed the Straps for ourselves Further along?
    The Risk we were Prepared to Take, The Ingratitude was Not Welcome….

Newsletter

Download Our Apps